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Dementia

This flyer includes an overview of what dementia is, what the symptoms are and how it’s diagnosed, as well as lots of links to support services, available locally and nationally.

This flyer includes an overview of what dementia is, what the symptoms are and how it's diagnosed, as well as lots of links to support services, available locally and nationally.

This flyer has been created by Dementia Action Liverpool (DAL) – a place for anyone with an interest in dementia to find out what is provided in and around Liverpool and to help organisations spread the word about their work.

The articles included below were chosen by DAL members who found the information particularly useful. Most importantly, it includes lots of contact details to local and national organisations who can support you if you live with dementia, you care for someone who does, or if you’re waiting for a diagnosis. We encourage everyone to reach out to these organisations and ask any questions you may have. There is a lot of help available out there so don’t be afraid to ask for the information you need. 

About dementia

Dementia is a syndrome (a group of related symptoms) associated with an ongoing decline of brain functioning. There are many different causes of dementia, and many different types.

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Symptoms

Dementia is not a disease itself. It's a collection of symptoms that result from damage to the brain caused by different diseases, such as Alzheimer's.

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Diagnosis

Getting a diagnosis gives you and your family the best chance to prepare for the future. Learn more about how dementia is diagnosed.

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Finances

People living with dementia may have always managed their own or their family's finances. But at some point they may need extra support to help them.

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Mersey Care Dementia Services

Everyone is different and the way they experience memory problems will be different. Mersey Care provide a number of Dementia Services, as well as details of other support organisations.

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Local support services

There are lots of dementia support services available in Merseyside. Take a look at these options.

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National support services

There are various organisations that can help with any questions or concerns about dementia you may have. Take a look at them here.

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About dementia

Dementia is a syndrome (a group of related symptoms) associated with an ongoing decline of brain functioning. There are many different causes of dementia, and many different types.

It’s normal for your memory to be affected by stress, tiredness, certain illnesses and medicines. But if you’re becoming increasingly forgetful, particularly if you’re over the age of 65, it’s a good idea to talk to a GP about the early signs of dementia.

Memory loss can be annoying if it happens occasionally, but if it’s affecting your daily life, or it’s worrying you, or someone you know, you should get help from a GP.

Dementia is not only about memory loss. It can also affect the way you speak, think, feel and behave.

It’s also important to remember that dementia is not a natural part of ageing.

What is dementia

Dementia is a syndrome (a group of related symptoms) associated with an ongoing decline of brain functioning.

There are many different causes of dementia, and many different types.

People often get confused about the difference between Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. Alzheimer’s disease is a type of dementia and, together with vascular dementia, makes up the majority of cases.

Symptoms of dementia

Dementia symptoms may include problems with:

  • memory loss
  • thinking speed
  • mental sharpness and quickness
  • language, such as using words incorrectly, or trouble speaking
  • understanding
  • judgement
  • mood
  • movement
  • difficulties doing daily activities

People with dementia can lose interest in their usual activities, and may have problems managing their behaviour or emotions.

They may also find social situations difficult and lose interest in relationships and socialising.

Aspects of their personality may change, and they may lose empathy (understanding and compassion).

A person with dementia may see or hear things that other people do not (hallucinations).

Because people with dementia may lose the ability to remember events, or not fully understand their environment or situations, it can seem as if they’re not telling the truth or are wilfully ignoring problems.

As dementia affects a person’s mental abilities, they may find planning and organising difficult. Maintaining their independence may also become a problem.

A person with dementia will usually need help from friends or relatives, including help with making decisions.

The symptoms of dementia usually become worse over time. In the late stage of dementia, people will not be able to take care of themselves and may lose their ability to communicate.

Read more about the symptoms of dementia.

Why it’s important to get a diagnosis

Although there is no cure for dementia at the moment, an early diagnosis means its progress can be slowed down in some cases, so the person may be able to maintain their mental function for longer.

A diagnosis helps people with dementia get the right treatment and support. It can also help them, and the people close to them, to prepare for the future.

With treatment and support, many people are able to lead active, fulfilled lives with dementia.

Read more about how dementia is diagnosed.

How common is dementia

Research shows there are more than 850,000 people in the UK who have dementia. One in 14 people over the age of 65 have dementia, and the condition affects 1 in 6 people over 80.

The number of people with dementia is increasing because people are living longer. It is estimated that by 2025, the number of people with dementia in the UK will be more than 1 million.

Content provided by the NHS Website

Find information and advice on health conditions, symptoms, healthy living, medicines and how to get help.

Published on Thu, 08 Apr 2021 15:41:38 GMT
Modified on Wed, 14 Apr 2021 09:57:37 GMT

Symptoms

Dementia is not a disease itself. It's a collection of symptoms that result from damage to the brain caused by different diseases, such as Alzheimer's.

Common early symptoms of dementia

Different types of dementia can affect people differently, and everyone will experience symptoms in their own way.

However, there are some common early symptoms that may appear some time before a diagnosis of dementia. These include:

  • memory loss
  • difficulty concentrating
  • finding it hard to carry out familiar daily tasks, such as getting confused over the correct change when shopping
  • struggling to follow a conversation or find the right word
  • being confused about time and place
  • mood changes

These symptoms are often mild and may get worse only very gradually. It’s often termed “mild cognitive impairment” (MCI) as the symptoms are not severe enough to be diagnosed as dementia.

You might not notice these symptoms if you have them, and family and friends may not notice or take them seriously for some time. In some people, these symptoms will remain the same and not worsen. But some people with MCI will go on to develop dementia.

Dementia is not a natural part of ageing. This is why it’s important to talk to a GP sooner rather than later if you’re worried about memory problems or other symptoms.

Symptoms specific to Alzheimer’s disease

The most common cause of dementia is Alzheimer’s disease. Common symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease include:

  • memory problems, such as regularly forgetting recent events, names and faces
  • asking questions repetitively
  • increasing difficulties with tasks and activities that require organisation and planning
  • becoming confused in unfamiliar environments
  • difficulty finding the right words
  • difficulty with numbers and/or handling money in shops
  • becoming more withdrawn or anxious

Read more about Alzheimer’s disease.

Symptoms specific to vascular dementia

Vascular dementia is the second most common cause of dementia, after Alzheimer’s. Some people have both vascular dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, often called “mixed dementia”.

Symptoms of vascular dementia are similar to Alzheimer’s disease, although memory loss may not be as obvious in the early stages.

Symptoms can sometimes develop suddenly and quickly get worse, but they can also develop gradually over many months or years.

Specific symptoms can include:

  • stroke-like symptoms: including muscle weakness or temporary paralysis on one side of the body (these symptoms require urgent medical attention)
  • movement problems – difficulty walking or a change in the way a person walks
  • thinking problems – having difficulty with attention, planning and reasoning
  • mood changes – depression and a tendency to become more emotional

Read more about vascular dementia.

Symptoms specific to dementia with Lewy bodies

Dementia with Lewy bodies has many of the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease, and people with the condition typically also experience:

  • periods of being alert or drowsy, or fluctuating levels of confusion
  • visual hallucinations (seeing things that are not there)
  • becoming slower in their physical movements
  • repeated falls and fainting
  • sleep disturbances.

Read more about dementia with Lewy bodies.

Symptoms specific to frontotemporal dementia

Although Alzheimer’s disease is still the most common type of dementia in people under 65, a higher percentage of people in this age group may develop frontotemporal dementia than older people. Most cases are diagnosed in people aged 45-65.

Early symptoms of frontotemporal dementia may include:

  • personality changes – reduced sensitivity to others’ feelings, making people seem cold and unfeeling
  • lack of social awareness – making inappropriate jokes or showing a lack of tact, though some people may become very withdrawn and apathetic
  • language problems – difficulty finding the right words or understanding them
  • becoming obsessive – such as developing fads for unusual foods, overeating and drinking

Read more about frontotemporal dementia.

Symptoms in the later stages of dementia

As dementia progresses, memory loss and difficulties with communication often become severe. In the later stages, the person is likely to neglect their own health, and require constant care and attention.

The most common symptoms of advanced dementia include:

  • memory problems – people may not recognise close family and friends, or remember where they live or where they are
  • communication problems – some people may eventually lose the ability to speak altogether. Using non-verbal means of communication, such as facial expressions, touch and gestures, can help
  • mobility problems – many people become less able to move about unaided. Some may eventually become unable to walk and require a wheelchair or be confined to bed
  • behavioural problems – a significant number of people will develop what are known as “behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia”. These may include increased agitation, depressive symptoms, anxiety, wandering, aggression, or sometimes hallucinations
  • bladder incontinence is common in the later stages of dementia, and some people will also experience bowel incontinence
  • appetite and weight loss problems are both common in advanced dementia. Many people have trouble eating or swallowing, and this can lead to choking, chest infections and other problems. Alzheimer’s Society has a useful factsheet on eating and drinking

Content provided by the NHS Website

Find information and advice on health conditions, symptoms, healthy living, medicines and how to get help.

Published on Fri, 09 Apr 2021 10:53:04 GMT
Modified on Wed, 14 Apr 2021 10:45:01 GMT

Getting a diagnosis gives you and your family the best chance to prepare for the future. Learn more about how dementia is diagnosed.

What to do if you've just been diagnosed with dementia

If you have just been diagnosed with dementia, you may feel numb, scared, and find it difficult to take everything in.

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How to get a dementia diagnosis

If you're worried about your memory, or think you may have dementia, it's a good idea to see a GP.

View more

Tests for diagnosing dementia

There's no single test for dementia. A diagnosis is based on a combination of assessments and tests.

View more

What to do if you've just been diagnosed with dementia

If you have just been diagnosed with dementia, you may feel numb, scared, and find it difficult to take everything in.

Give yourself time to adjust to what a dementia diagnosis means for you.

You may find it helpful to talk to a counsellor at a memory clinic, if a local clinic offers this type of support.

You can also contact the helpline of a dementia charity, such as:

If you can, share your feelings about the dementia diagnosis with family and friends.

When you feel ready, create an action plan for the future while you’re still able to make clear decisions for yourself.

Get assessed for care and support

Your local authority has a duty to do a care and support needs assessment to find out what help you need.

A care and support needs assessment is free.

To arrange an assessment, contact your local social services. Alternatively, a GP, consultant, or another health or social care professional can make a referral to your local authority, after getting your consent.

For more information, read the Alzheimer’s Society’s guide to care and support in England.

Services and support

Find out what services are available in your area, so you’re prepared and able to use this support if you need it.

Services arranged by local authorities vary between areas, but may include home care services, equipment, and adaptations for your home.

Some services, such as community nursing, are arranged by the NHS. Ask your hospital consultant or GP for details.

Charities such as Age UK, Alzheimer’s Society and Dementia UK provide a range of services, including helplines, support groups, day centres, shopping services and home care.

Read more about what to expect from social services and the NHS and where to find help and support for people with dementia.

Find local dementia services

Make a will

It’s a good idea to make a will if you have not made one already. This ensures that when you die, your money and possessions go to the people you choose.

A person with dementia can still make or change a will, provided they can show that they understand what they’re doing and what the effects will be. A solicitor can advise if this is the case.

Read more about making a will on our page about managing legal affairs for someone with dementia.

Put your papers in order

Make sure all your important papers can be found easily. These might include bank and building society statements, mortgage or rental documents, insurance policies, your will, tax and pension details, bills and guarantees.

Consider setting up direct debits or standing orders for your regular bills. This means they’ll be paid automatically from your bank account each month.

Find out more about managing money when you have dementia.

Claim benefits

Make sure you’re claiming all the benefits you’re entitled to.

In particular, check whether:

  • you’re eligible for Personal Independence Payment or Attendance Allowance – find out more on our page about benefits for over-65s
  • your carer (if you have one) is eligible for Carer’s Allowance

Other benefits you may be eligible for include Income Support, Housing Benefit, Council Tax Reduction and Pension Credit.

Age UK has more about benefits, and how to claim them.

Choose someone to have lasting power of attorney

You can make one or more people an “attorney” to manage your affairs, including your money, property, and medical treatment, if it becomes necessary.

You can choose anyone you trust to be your attorney (usually a close friend or family member), but they must be over 18.

Find out more about power of attorney on our page about managing legal affairs for someone with dementia.

Advance care planning

You may want to make plans for your future care, called an “advance statement” and an “advance decision”. These let your family and healthcare professionals know your wishes for your care if you become unable to make decisions (lack mental capacity) in the future.

Read more about advance statements and advance decisions on our page about managing legal affairs for someone with dementia.

Driving

A diagnosis of dementia does not necessarily mean you have to stop driving immediately, but you’re legally required to inform the DVLA and your car insurance company promptly.

The DVLA may contact your hospital consultant or GP for more information. It may also arrange to assess your driving or eyesight, to check you can drive safely.

The Alzheimer’s Society has more information about driving and dementia.

Take care of your health

It’s important to look after your physical and mental health when you have dementia.

To stay healthy:

See a GP if you feel unwell. Problems, such as urinary tract infections (UTIs), can make you feel more confused or agitated if they’re not treated quickly.

Find out more about living well with dementia.

Create your life story

A “memory book” can be a way to stimulate your memory and reconnect you with your loved ones in the future.

Your memory book could include photographs, notes, and keepsakes from your childhood through to the present day. It can be a physical book or a digital version.

You may also want to create a digital or online playlist of your favourite music.

Dementia books on prescription

Reading Well Books on Prescription offer helpful information for people diagnosed with dementia, and their relatives and carers.

GPs and other healthcare professionals can recommend titles from a wide range of books about dementia.

The books are available for anyone to borrow free of charge from their local library. Some books might be available as e-books or audiobooks.

Find out more about Reading Well Books on Prescription for dementia.

Content provided by the NHS Website

Find information and advice on health conditions, symptoms, healthy living, medicines and how to get help.

Published on Fri, 09 Apr 2021 12:28:44 GMT
Modified on Tue, 13 Apr 2021 12:40:12 GMT

How to get a dementia diagnosis

If you're worried about your memory, or think you may have dementia, it's a good idea to see a GP.

Getting a diagnosis gives you and your family the best chance to prepare for the future.

With treatment and support from healthcare professionals, family, and friends, many people are able to lead active, fulfilling lives with dementia.

What to expect when you see a GP about dementia

A GP will ask about your symptoms and other aspects of your health.

They’ll also ask if you’re finding it difficult to manage everyday activities such as:

  • washing and dressing (personal care)
  • cooking and shopping
  • paying bills

If possible, someone who knows you well should be with you at your GP appointment, so they can describe any changes or problems they’ve noticed. They could also help you remember what was said at the appointment, if this is difficult for you.

Memory problems do not necessarily mean you have dementia. These problems can have other causes, such as:

To help rule out other causes of memory problems, the GP will do a physical examination and may organise tests, such as a blood test and urine test.

You’ll also be asked to do a memory or cognitive test to check any problems with your memory or ability to think clearly.

Read more about the tests used to diagnose dementia.

Referral to a dementia specialist

Dementia can be difficult to diagnose, especially if your symptoms are mild.

If the GP has been able to rule out other causes for your symptoms, they’ll refer you to a healthcare professional who specialises in diagnosing dementia, such as:

  • a psychiatrist with experience of treating dementia (an old-age psychiatrist)
  • a doctor specialising in elderly care (a geriatrician)
  • a doctor specialising in the brain and nervous system (a neurologist)

The specialist may work in a memory clinic with other professionals who are experts in diagnosing, caring for, and advising people with dementia, and their families.

It’s important to make good use of your time with the specialist. Write down questions you want to ask, make a note of any medical terms the doctor uses, and ask if you can come back if you think of more questions later. Taking the opportunity to go back can be very helpful.

The specialist may organise more tests. One of these might be a brain scan, such as a CT scan, or an MRI scan.

They may also do further, more detailed memory tests.

If the specialist is still not certain about the diagnosis, you may need to have further, more complex tests. But most cases of dementia can be diagnosed after these assessments.

If the diagnosis is dementia

Dementia is one of the health conditions that people are most afraid of.

A study by the Alzheimer’s Society has shown that more than half of people wait for up to a year before getting help for dementia symptoms, because they feel afraid. But an accurate and early diagnosis can have many benefits.

After you’ve had the necessary tests (or sometimes before the tests), your doctor should ask if you want to know your diagnosis.

They should explain what having dementia might mean for you and give you time to talk about the condition and ask questions.

Unless you decide otherwise, your doctor, or a member of their team, should talk to you and your family or carer about:

  • the type of dementia you have or, if it’s not clear, they should talk to you about being assessed again in the future
  • the symptoms and how the condition might develop
  • the treatments you might be offered
  • the name of a health or social care professional who will co-ordinate the different types of support you need
  • care and support services in your area, including support groups and voluntary organisations for people with dementia, their families and carers
  • advocacy services
  • how dementia will affect your driving or employment, if this applies to you
  • where you can get financial and legal advice
  • You should also be given written information about dementia.

Ongoing dementia assessment

After you’ve been diagnosed with dementia, the GP should arrange to see you from time to time, to check how you’re managing.

The memory service where you were assessed may also continue to see you in the early stages.

The GP and the specialist may also jointly prescribe medicines that may help some of the symptoms of dementia. But not everyone will benefit from these medicines.

During a follow-up appointment with a GP, or other healthcare professional, they’ll check how the dementia is progressing and if you have any new care needs.

Ongoing appointments are also a chance to talk about your plans for the future, such as Lasting Power of Attorney, to take care of your future welfare or financial needs, or an advance statement about your future care.

Dementia research

If you’re diagnosed with dementia, or mild cognitive impairment (MCI), you may be able to help scientists better understand the condition by taking part in research.

Dementia research projects are happening around the world, and some are based in the UK. If you’re a carer of someone with dementia, you may also be able to take part in research.

Find out more about volunteering for research and trials on the NHS Join Dementia Research website.

Content provided by the NHS Website

Find information and advice on health conditions, symptoms, healthy living, medicines and how to get help.

Published on Fri, 09 Apr 2021 11:23:46 GMT
Modified on Tue, 13 Apr 2021 14:24:55 GMT

Tests for diagnosing dementia

There's no single test for dementia. A diagnosis is based on a combination of assessments and tests.

Taking a history

This is usually done by a GP. If you’re referred to a specialist, a more detailed history will be taken.

It helps if someone who knows you well is also with you, as they can help describe any changes or problems they’ve noticed.

The doctor will:

  • ask how and when symptoms started and whether they’re affecting daily life
  • check whether any existing conditions, such as heart disease, diabetes, depression or stroke, are being properly managed
  • review any medicines you’re taking, including prescribed medicines, those bought over the counter from pharmacies, and any alternative products, such as vitamin supplements

Mental ability tests to diagnose dementia

People with symptoms of dementia are given tests to check their mental abilities, such as memory or thinking.

These tests are known as cognitive assessments, and may be done initially by a GP.

There are several different tests. A common one used by GPs is the General Practitioner Assessment of Cognition (GPCOG).

Although these tests cannot diagnose dementia, they may show there are memory difficulties that need further investigation.

Most tests involve a series of pen-and-paper tests and questions, each of which carries a score.

These tests assess a number of different mental abilities, including:

  • short- and long-term memory
  • concentration and attention span
  • language and communication skills
  • awareness of time and place (orientation)

It’s important to remember that test scores may be influenced by a person’s level of education.

For example, someone who cannot read or write very well may have a lower score, but they may not have dementia.

Similarly, someone with a higher level of education may achieve a higher score, but still have dementia.

Blood tests to check for other conditions

Your GP will arrange for blood tests to help exclude other causes of symptoms that can be confused with dementia.

In most cases, these blood tests will check:

  • liver function
  • kidney function
  • thyroid function
  • haemoglobin A1c (to check for diabetes)
  • vitamin B12 and folate levels

If your doctor thinks you may have an infection, they may also ask you to do a urine test or other investigations.

Read more about blood tests.

Dementia brain scans

Brain scans are often used for diagnosing dementia once the simpler tests have ruled out other problems.

Like memory tests, on their own brain scans cannot diagnose dementia, but are used as part of the wider assessment.

Not everyone will need a brain scan, particularly if the tests and assessments show that dementia is a likely diagnosis.

These scans may also be used to check for evidence of other possible problems that could explain a person’s symptoms, such as a stroke or a brain tumour..

An MRI scan is recommended to:

  • help confirm a diagnosis of dementia and the type of disease causing the dementia
  • provide detailed information about the blood vessel damage that happens in vascular dementia
  • show shrinkage in specific areas of the brain – for example, the frontal and temporal lobes are mainly affected by shrinkage in frontotemporal dementia, while usually just the temporal lobes are affected in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease

A CT scan can be used to check for signs of stroke or a brain tumour. But it cannot provide detailed information about the structure of the brain.

Even if a brain scan does not show any obvious changes, this does not mean someone does not have dementia.

Other scans and procedures to diagnose dementia

Other types of scan, such as a SPECT scan or a PET scan, may be recommended if the result of your MRI or CT scan is uncertain.

However, most people will not need these types of scans.

Both SPECT and PET scans look at how the brain functions, and can pick up abnormalities with the blood flow in the brain.

If a specialist is worried that epilepsy may be causing the dementia symptoms, an EEG may be taken to record the brain’s electrical signals (brain activity), but this is rare.

Content provided by the NHS Website

Find information and advice on health conditions, symptoms, healthy living, medicines and how to get help.

Published on Fri, 09 Apr 2021 11:55:50 GMT
Modified on Tue, 13 Apr 2021 14:24:34 GMT

Content provided by the NHS Website

Find information and advice on health conditions, symptoms, healthy living, medicines and how to get help.

Published on Fri, 09 Apr 2021 14:00:55 GMT
Modified on Tue, 13 Apr 2021 14:24:24 GMT

Finances

People living with dementia may have always managed their own or their family's finances. But at some point they may need extra support to help them.

Lasting power of attorney (LPA)

If you’re living with dementia and can still make your own decisions (have mental capacity), it’s a good idea to set up an LPA for your financial and property affairs.

Choose someone you trust to act as your attorney. This means they can act on your behalf, and in your best interests, when you can no longer make decisions.

Once registered, the LPA can be used with your permission, even if you’re still able to deal with many aspects of your finances yourself. Or it can be held in readiness for when you can no longer make decisions.

Read more about a lasting power of attorney.

Tips for making money easier to manage

There are steps you can take now to manage your financial affairs more easily:

  • set up standing orders or direct debits for regular bills and subscriptions so they’re paid on time
  • have all your income, including pension and benefits, paid into your bank or building society account
  • consider getting a chip and signature card – you only need supply your signature rather than a personal identification 
  • set up a third party mandate – this gives someone else access to your bank account; you can specify how much access to give (for example, a set amount for the weekly shop)

Read more tips from the Money Advice Service.

If you’re a carer or friend of someone with dementia, find out how to help someone informally with day-to-day money.

Joint accounts

If you already have or are considering setting up a joint bank or building society account, remember that:

  • each account holder can withdraw money without asking the other person
  • you’re each liable for the other’s debts
  • if you lose mental capacity and don’t have an LPA, the bank may restrict the account to essential transactions

It’s sensible to set up or keep a separate personal account for money that isn’t used for essential bills.

Benefits for people with dementia and their carers

There are a range of benefits that you and your carer, if you have one, may be entitled to.

Some may be means-tested (whether you get them will depend on your financial situation). Others may depend on your National Insurance contributions or your health and care needs.

If you haven’t done so already, it’s a good idea to get a needs assessment from social services.

This is free and can identify anything you may need help with. It may also show that you qualify for benefits, such as Attendance Allowance.

A carer can also apply to social services for a carer’s assessment, which can show if they’re eligible for support from their local council, including benefits such as Carer’s Allowance.

Benefits for people with dementia

You may have extra expenses, such as paying for help at home, so it’s important to make sure you’re receiving all the benefits you’re entitled to.

These include:

  • Attendance Allowance – for over-65s who need help at home; you can claim Attendance Allowance regardless of your income and savings
  • Personal Independence Payment (PIP) – for under-65s who need help at home

If you get Attendance Allowance, you may also be entitled to other benefits, such as:

Find out more about benefits for over-65s

Benefits for carers

As a carer, you may be entitled to one or more benefits to help you with the cost of caring, such as:

  • Carer’s Allowance – the main state benefit for people who look after someone for more than 35 hours a week
  • Carer’s Credit – a National Insurance (NI) credit for those under State Pension age and looking after someone for more than 20 hours a week

Find out more about benefits for carers

Claiming benefits on behalf of someone else

If you look after someone who can’t manage their money because they have lost mental capacity, you can apply for the right to claim their benefits.

Check what benefits you can get

Getting financial advice for future care costs

Your local council has a duty to help you get independent financial advice so you can plan and prepare for future care costs.

This covers a range of services, from general sources of information and advice, such as websites or telephone helplines, to tailored advice relating to specific financial products that can only be provided by a regulated financial adviser.

Some of these services may charge a fee.

Read Age UK’s information on planning for future care costs.

Get help and advice

Get expert benefits advice, plus help filling in claim forms:

Content provided by the NHS Website

Find information and advice on health conditions, symptoms, healthy living, medicines and how to get help.

Published on Fri, 09 Apr 2021 15:47:35 GMT
Modified on Wed, 14 Apr 2021 11:10:03 GMT

Mersey Care Dementia Services

Everyone is different and the way they experience memory problems will be different. Mersey Care provide a number of Dementia Services, as well as details of other support organisations.

Worried about your memory?

As we go through life we all notice some changes, sometimes it’s an odd ache or pain, our joints may be a little stiff, it takes us longer to do things than it used to and sometimes we notice changes with our memory. This can be due to a variety of reasons but it is important to know that problems with memory are not a normal part of growing older and should always be checked out. It could be caused by feeling down, depressed or stressed but it’s worth getting checked out.

Dementia is the name given to a group of conditions that affect the way we think, our memory and sometimes our speech and perception. There are more than 800,000 people in the UK living with dementia, and probably a lot more that we don’t know about.

There are lots of sources of help and support. Treatment is available for some types and with the right support you can live well with dementia.

So please don’t keep worrying about your memory, get it checked out. Go to your GP or call Health watch on 0300 77 77 007, where you can get more information.

You can find out more about dementia on these websites:

Getting checked out

Don’t be embarrassed from seeking help – it’s important you are checked out. It may be nothing but dementia isn’t part of natural ageing.

Our memory services

Everyone is different and the way they experience memory problems will be different.

Support in your area

Local organisations offering help and advice.

Dementia Friends

By becoming a dementia friend you can help raise awareness to help eradicate the stigma surrounding dementia. To find your nearest session click or tap here and enter your postcode.

Content provided by NHS Mersey Care.

Published on Fri, 09 Apr 2021 10:06:48 GMT
Modified on Wed, 28 Apr 2021 09:51:38 GMT

There are lots of dementia support services available in Merseyside. Take a look at these options.

Liverpool Dementia Action Alliance

A place for anyone with an interest in dementia to find out what is provided in and around Liverpool and to help organisations spread the word about their work. (Image: JimmyGuano, copyright: CC BY-SA 3.0)

SURF Liverpool

The Liverpool Service User Reference Forum (SURF) is a group of people who represent the views of people living with dementia, their carers & families across the City of Liverpool.

Dementia UK – Admiral Nurses

Offers free confidential advice and support on any aspect of dementia care. We provide mental health nurses specialising in dementia care, called Admiral Nurses.

Dementia Together Wirral

Offering social support & friendship for people affected by dementia and memory loss across Wirral since 2017.

The Brain Charity – Dementia Services

The Brain Charity offers emotional support, practical help and social activities to anyone with a neurological condition and to their family, friends, and carers.

Mersey Care Dementia Services

Everyone is different and the way they experience memory problems will be different. Mersey Care provide a number of Dementia Services, as well as details of other support organisations.

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Mersey Care Dementia Services

Everyone is different and the way they experience memory problems will be different. Mersey Care provide a number of Dementia Services, as well as details of other support organisations.

Worried about your memory?

As we go through life we all notice some changes, sometimes it’s an odd ache or pain, our joints may be a little stiff, it takes us longer to do things than it used to and sometimes we notice changes with our memory. This can be due to a variety of reasons but it is important to know that problems with memory are not a normal part of growing older and should always be checked out. It could be caused by feeling down, depressed or stressed but it’s worth getting checked out.

Dementia is the name given to a group of conditions that affect the way we think, our memory and sometimes our speech and perception. There are more than 800,000 people in the UK living with dementia, and probably a lot more that we don’t know about.

There are lots of sources of help and support. Treatment is available for some types and with the right support you can live well with dementia.

So please don’t keep worrying about your memory, get it checked out. Go to your GP or call Health watch on 0300 77 77 007, where you can get more information.

You can find out more about dementia on these websites:

Getting checked out

Don’t be embarrassed from seeking help – it’s important you are checked out. It may be nothing but dementia isn’t part of natural ageing.

Our memory services

Everyone is different and the way they experience memory problems will be different.

Support in your area

Local organisations offering help and advice.

Dementia Friends

By becoming a dementia friend you can help raise awareness to help eradicate the stigma surrounding dementia. To find your nearest session click or tap here and enter your postcode.

Content provided by NHS Mersey Care.

Published on Fri, 09 Apr 2021 10:06:48 GMT
Modified on Wed, 28 Apr 2021 09:51:38 GMT

Content provided by the NHS Website

Find information and advice on health conditions, symptoms, healthy living, medicines and how to get help.

Published on Fri, 09 Apr 2021 15:48:15 GMT
Modified on Wed, 14 Apr 2021 12:27:43 GMT

National support services

There are various organisations that can help with any questions or concerns about dementia you may have. Take a look at them here.

Alzheimer’s Society

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Dementia UK

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Age UK

Reduce the risk of heart attack & stroke during COVID-19

Carers UK

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Content provided by the NHS Website

Find information and advice on health conditions, symptoms, healthy living, medicines and how to get help.

Published on Fri, 09 Apr 2021 16:11:08 GMT
Modified on Tue, 13 Apr 2021 12:44:56 GMT

Content provided by Dementia Action Liverpool (DAL).

Dementia Action Liverpool (DAL) is a place for anyone with an interest in dementia to find out what is provided in and around Liverpool and to help organisations spread the word about their work.

Published on Tue, 13 Apr 2021 12:35:28 GMT
Modified on Wed, 28 Apr 2021 09:55:28 GMT